When The Past Comes Back to Attack You (My Review of “A Generation of Curses” by Patricia Bridewell and Faatima Albasair-Johnson)

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I am convinced that one of the biggest human struggles is trying to exist apart from a horrible past—a past that seems to come back from the annals of time to attack at you. If you’re in that spot, there seems to be nothing you can do to escape the horror and move on. Khadesia Hill, the heroine of the novel “A Generation of Curses” seems to suffer from that struggle—so much so, that she finds herself in jail for a murder she swears she didn’t commit.

In the heart of Los Angeles, Khadesia eases into life as the wife of an assistant pastor and assumes the role of mother and potential first lady. However, the authors—Patricia Bridewell and Faatima Albasair-Johnson—introduce readers to first class drama right at the outset. Khadesia’s sister-in-law, Stacy, has ulterior motives as she wants to propel her man to be next in line for Bishop. Ultimately, Khadesia finds herself fighting for her marriage, her freedom, and even the love she left when she ran away from Kansas City.

“A Generation of Curses” is a classic Christian novel that deals with some of the unfortunate issues that go on in the church. The body of Christ was never about division and strife, rather unity in love. Too often, however, parishioners get caught up in title fights, parking spot rights and petty bickering about issues that are truly beneath them. Would the Bishop put haughtiness aside and see what was bothering his daughter-in-law? Would Stacy grow up and stop scheming long enough to show love to a woman who has lost a great deal. Will Malcolm, the husband, be man enough to fight for what’s really important?

I enjoyed the novel but felt that there were some parts of the prose that were unnecessary and lent nothing to the overall movement of the story. Aside from that, I feel that “A Generation of Curses” is a good read.

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